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New Orleans Pelicans forward Julius Randle drives against Toronto Raptors centre Eric Moreland during the first half of a game at the Smoothie King Center, in New Orleans, on Oct. 11, 2018.

Derick E. Hingle/USA TODAY Sports via Reuters

Pascal Siakam had 21 points and 11 rebounds and OG Anunoby added 15 points as a shorthanded Toronto Raptors squad wrapped up preseason play with a 134-119 win over the New Orleans Pelicans on Thursday.

CJ Miles had 14 points on 5-of-7 shooting – including 3 of 4 from the three-point line – off the bench for Toronto (4-1). Malachi Richardson had 21 points, Kay Felder had 15 and both Jordan Loyd and Eric Moreland had 12 apiece.

Anthony Davis paced the Pelicans (0-5) with 36 points, 15 rebounds and four blocks. Julius Randle also had a double-double of 20 points and 11 rebounds. Nikola Mirotic, Jrue Holiday and E’Twaun Moore were in double-digits at 15, 14 and 12 points, respectively.

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Toronto’s Chris Boucher fell and was helped to the locker-room in the fourth quarter. The Raptors said the Montreal native passed concussion protocol and will continue to be monitored.

The Raptors rested stars Kawhi Leonard and Kyle Lowry as well as regulars Serge Ibaka, Jonas Valanciunas, Danny Green and Fred Van Vleet.

Toronto went with a starting lineup of Lorenzo Brown, Loyd, Anunoby, Siakam and Greg Monroe.

The Pelicans, meanwhile, utilized their full squadron, including starters Davis, Holiday, Moore, Mirotic and Elfrid Payton, as well as Randle in reserve.

Norman Powell, who is dealing with left IT band tenderness, and Delon Wright, who is nursing a strained left thigh muscle, both sat out for Toronto.

Jahill Okafor did not suit up for New Orleans.

The Toronto Raptors host the Cleveland Cavaliers on Wednesday in the season opener for both teams.

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