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Economic exodus

Encana has decided to pull up stakes and move much of its operations south of the border (Encana Leaves For U.S., Deepening Pain In Oil Patch, Nov. 1).

Meanwhile, Ford and General Motors are busy shedding jobs in Ontario. In British Columbia, the forestry industry is ailing big time. In the Maritimes, the fishery is perpetually in trouble and unemployment remains a concern. And so it goes. Canada’s regional economic woes are adding up, in large measure because of forces beyond our immediate control.

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All of this underscores the need for our political leaders – federal and provincial – to get together to devise a national economic strategy. Instead of spending our time name-calling and bemoaning regional concerns, Canadians would all be much better off if we had a grand vision of where this country is headed and how best we can get there.

To borrow a sentiment uttered by Benjamin Franklin at the 1776 signing of the U.S. Declaration of Independence, “We must, indeed, all hang together or, most assuredly, we shall all hang separately.” Sure, the context was different. But the message certainly applies today here in Canada.

Ken Cuthbertson Kingston


Encana was the largest company in Canada at one time, and now it will no longer be Canadian.

As a Canadian, I am shocked and utterly disgusted that the politicians and others in Canada cannot see that the gutting of the energy industry is bad for Canada’s long-term health. We will no longer be managers of our resources, but subservient to American and international interests.

Maybe that is what other Canadians, including the government, want, but it is shortsighted and detrimental to our whole country in the long term. I can assure you that once all the Canadian energy companies move to the United States or elsewhere, they won’t be coming back.

Just for perspective, losing Encana is similar to Quebec losing Bombardier, Air Canada and Desjardin in one fell swoop or Ontario losing Bayer, BASF, 3M, Ford, Intact and Labatt all at once. The economic effect is felt in direct and indirect job losses, reputational damage in the investment community and psychological morale damage to the general populace.

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What astounds me is that Canadians and the Canadian government are not alarmed by this latest development in a long series of companies leaving Canada.

R. Paul Blazek Calgary

He is who he is

Re Pucks, Nets, Breakaways And Errant Shots Aside, Scheer Had Better Redefine Himself – And Quickly (Nov. 1):

Redefining politicians is usually a formula for disaster and probably the road to political defeat. Someone is who they are. You can change the number on the uniform, but the player still remains the same. If Conservative Leader Andrew Scheer can’t win being Andrew Scheer, then he can’t win not being Andrew Scheer.

Douglas Cornish Ottawa

Alberta first

Re Alberta Premier Calls For First Ministers Meeting (Nov. 1):

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So Jason Kenney wants to get all the political leaders in the country together to discuss “urgent issues.” It seems his list of urgent issues is limited to Alberta’s financial interests alone. I would have thought a list of urgent issues to be discussed in such a national setting would have included at least a few “lesser issues” – such as climate change and gun control.

Ken Dixon Toronto

Time passages

Re B.C. Introduces Measures To End Seasonal Time Changes (Online, Nov. 1):

In the long run, humans, like other animals, behave in terms of the rhythm of sunrise and sunset. Setting the clock forward an hour fools us only because we also set it back an hour for a number of months each year.

If it is is permanently changed, we will gradually adapt to the new time. Business will start later and finish later, schools will shift to match businesses, so people will get up later and go to bed later.

In some number of years, life will be back to where we started, just calling it a different time, because the powers of human body rhythms are stronger than numbers on a clock.

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Michael Moore Toronto

Fishing is not sporting

Re Fish Should Be Part Of The Animal Welfare Conversation (Oct. 21): We so appreciated the opinion article on including fish in our circle of compassion.

We are constantly dumbfounded that otherwise kind people think nothing of going out on pleasure boats to torture another species (no, folks, catch-and-release is in no way humane).

We are going to make copies of the article and put them in the hands of every neighbour who answers our simple “Good morning” with a callous, “Yep, great day to go fishing.”

Tom and Jayn Meinhardt Redington Beach, Fla.

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Unplugging on Toyota

I have owned three cars in my life, all have been from Toyota. I have been talking with my salesperson Tony about a Toyota Prius Prime plug-in hybrid. But stop the presses: GM, Fiat, Toyota Among Automakers Siding With Trump In Legal Fight With California (Online, Oct. 29). What?

Toyota is fighting the California Air Resources Board? The board’s vehicle emissions limits have often been more stringent than U.S. federal standards, and manufacturers have had to step up if they want to sell cars in that populous state. Subsequently, we in North America all benefit from these greener vehicles – Toyota wants to help bring this down?

Tony just called and left a message that he’s tracked down a Prius. Not to be rude, but I’m not calling Tony back. Ever. A shame. Bye, bye, Toyota.

Melissa McDonald Toronto

Tree TLC

Re Make Like A Tree (Letters, Oct. 29): A letter writer implores the government to get busy planting the trees it has promised. However, it’s the existing big trees that are providing so many ecological services, including the vital task of carbon sequestering. We shouldn’t neglect our big trees. They are gifts from past generations.

If an older tree needs attention, people should call a professional certified arborist, rather than the guy with a pickup truck and chainsaw.

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Toni Ellis Co-ordinator, Neighbourwoods, Elora, Ont.

It’s a global game

Re Bling Ring (Letters, Oct. 28): A letter writer describes the Toronto Raptors NBA championship rings as “an obscenity.” This matters not, as the rings will ultimately disappear from our view. What is an obscenity to me is the Raptors banner, which remains in full sight: “World champions," it proclaims.

Before making such claims, please ask Marc Gasol which trophy bestows upon him the title of world champion. Is it the NBA title he won in June? Or the FIBA World Cup he won with Spain in September? I imagine he would claim the latter.

Christopher Cottier West Vancouver, B.C.

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