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Prime Minister Justin Trudeau says Canada does not take lightly the decision of the U.S. to impose tariffs on steel and aluminum, especially based on national security grounds.

Reuters

Letters to the Editor should be exclusive to The Globe and Mail. Include your name, address and daytime phone number. Try to keep letters to fewer than 150 words. Letters may be edited for length and clarity. To submit a letter by e-mail, click here: letters@globeandmail.com

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Re Showdown (June 11): There are several ways to deal with a bully. You can capitulate. Give up your lunch money and your self-respect. You can be stubborn. Just take your beating and retain your self-respect. Or as Danny Blanchflower once famously said: You can get your retaliation in first.

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It’s about time Canada and Mexico tried option three.

Alan Ball, New Westminster, B.C.

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From the day of its signing, the NAFTA signatories were known as the Three Amigos. Today, the Three Amigos are Kim Jong-un, Vladimir Putin and li’l Donny Trump. Perhaps Walt was right, it’s a small world, after all.

Roger Kenrick, Toronto

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Prime Minister Justin Trudeau’s strong position at the G7 summit reminds me of what his father, Pierre Trudeau, said in speech at the Washington Press Club in 1969: “Living next to you is in some ways like sleeping with an elephant. No matter how friendly and even-tempered is the beast, if I can call it that, one is affected by every twitch and grunt.”

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My thanks to Justin Trudeau, whose steady, principled actions will not be swayed by the erratic and unpredictable behaviour of an elephant, especially when it comes to international relations.

Heinz Senger, Surrey, B.C.

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Justin Trudeau was set up for the takedown. The Americans did their homework on polling in Canada, and knew that some 30 per cent of respondents perceived Mr. Trudeau to be weak.

This plays to Donald Trump’s stength, because he loves nothing more than to beat up on perceived weakness. He fully expects Canada to roll over. Absent that, he will make life miserable.

Mr. Trudeau has had little experience dealing with people of power in business and politics. He has to respond, or he’ll soon find that Canada has no NAFTA treaty or access to the U.S. auto market. He has to do a better job getting out the facts on our trade with the U.S. to the American people.

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Running around Capitol Hill only appears to have angered Mr. Trump without getting the facts out. The PM should go see Darkest Hour for a little inspiration: Canada needs leadership now. Without it, we may well find out what a 50-cent dollar feels like.

Gordon Elliott, Parksville, B.C.

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Sadly, the Canadian approach to the NAFTA negotiations has been wrong from the start. It began when Foreign Affairs Minister Chrystia Freeland told Rex Tillerson, then U.S. secretary of state, that Canada would push back if pushed. This was before serious talks had taken place. Now our PM echoes those words, essentially sabre-rattling – with no sabre!

Ashok Sajnani, Toronto

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Lawrence Martin says we are helpless in the face of the schoolyard bully (What Can Trudeau Do About Trump? Nothing – June 11). They have howitzers, we have pop guns. So what is the PM supposed to do after being called dishonest, a backstabber and a threat to U.S. national security? Is he supposed to roll over, play dead and be kicked while he’s down?

No. He stands up says we will not be pushed around. Yes, it’s David versus Goliath. But who ended up winning that one?

Graham Clark, Mount Hope, Ont.

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When do we stop buying American? Give me the word.

Brian Kirsh, Toronto

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I recall a joke I read a long time ago. It helps provide context for what Donald Trump is doing to the rest of his allies, and it goes like this: A driver was heading down the freeway when his wife called his cellphone. “Johnny, I just heard on the news that there’s a car going the wrong way on Route 111. Please be careful!”

“It’s not just one car,” said Johnny. “It’s hundreds of them!”

The best course of action for us is to wait this out, as change is the only constant in politics.

Anas Khan, Beaumont, Alta.

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I’m beginning to imagine Donald Trump as a pro wrestler, wearing tights, strutting around the ring before a match, yelling insults and flexing his muscles to work up the crowd. There’d be room on my fridge for that political cartoon.

Barbara Parrott, Kingston

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Canada should proactively strengthen trade with nations willing to work in ways that actually add value in the extraction and manufacturing of resources and products. Threatening retaliatory tariffs toward a leader who speaks crassly, treats others badly, looks down on the poor and adores the rich, is unproductive and hopeless. The United States is our largest trading partner. It can always hurt us more.

Kalvin Yu, Brampton, Ont.

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I remain hopeful the liberal democratic world will survive, despite Donald Trump’s Twitter tantrums. A shining example is how the G7 and World Bank came together to support education for girls in disaster and conflict situations to the tune of $3.8-billion over three years. A lot of hard work among officials of the G7 nations and a coalition of NGOs led to this result, which it’s estimated may help some eight million children living in crisis.

Sherry Moran, Ottawa

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White House trade adviser Peter Navarro says Justin Trudeau will end up in a special place in hell. One hopes there won’t be perpetual reruns of The Apprentice.

Bruce Couchman, Ottawa

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We should ask David Mirvish to send complimentary tickets to the Toronto production of Come From Away to Donald Trump, Peter Navarro, Larry Kudlow, and John Bolton.

Peter Green, Chester Basin, N.S.

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I want to apologize for the behavior of my President. I am embarrassed by him. This is way beyond politics. His behaviour, words, and actions in so many circumstances are unforgiveable, and his recent attacks on you are misguided.

Much like my cat, who wanders into your yard to do his business, or a dog who shatters the peaceful quiet of a Sunday morning with his incessant barking, my President has pushed you to the limit, yet you remain polite, reserved, and calm in your response. You deserve better.

Neighbour, our history goes way back. I have vacationed in Canada for 53 of my 56 summers. My extended family has enjoyed the pristine waters of Lake Temagami in Northern Ontario for more than 100 years.

I have explored so much of your beautiful country, and never once encountered anyone who was not kind and helpful. (Okay, maybe once in Quebec, the waitress pretended she didn’t understand my high school French.)

As Prime Minister Justin Trudeau recently said, “We have to believe that at some point common sense will prevail.” I am waiting for that point as well.

I appreciate your patience while I get this messy time in my life figured out and get back on track. I’ll get the overgrown bushes trimmed back, the broken down-car towed from the driveway, and remove the couch from the front yard. I promise.Thank you for being a great neighbor.

Elizabeth Sobota, Chagrin Falls, Ohio

Editor’s Note: For more letters from Americans upset by their President’s conduct toward Canada, see Sorry, Canada: Americans apologize for their President’s words

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