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From the comments: Readers debate Hydro One, the U.S.’s place in NATO and electric cars

Hydro One workers gather at the Husky Travel Centre in Niagara-on-the-Lake, Ont. Monday, September 11, 2017. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Tara Walton

Tara Walton

From, Doug Ford kneecaps Hydro One, a column by Andrew Willis

Hydro One shares have done nothing in 2 years, down 25% from 12 months ago. The board and CEO give themselves a raise saying they hit their metrics? Your metric is the share price and your duty is to the shareholders which you have failed. Forget the rhetoric about Hydro rates, the truth is a failure to shareholders. This isn’t rocket science..... – Cognecy Investments

Replying to Cognecy Investments:

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In two years they have investigated, negotiated and purchased a large utility in the USA. I rather like the idea of Americans helping to pay the costs of my hydro bill. Do you think everything happens overnight? Really, now Ontario Hydro will go back to being some Conservative crony bootcamp when it had the chance of being a top player in North America. – Robert 01

Which elicited this response from Cognecy Investments:

Appreciate the reply Robert, but you have to realize that your Hydro bill is in no way related to Hydro One profitability. Hydro rates as others have mentioned are determined by the energy board not H1. The board and CEO have no duty to lower your bills. They provide power but don’t set the price of that power. Any additional profit they generate will go to their shareholders, the owners of the company. - Cognecy Investments

U.S. President Donald Trump leaves after a press conference at the end of a summit of heads of state and government at NATO headquarters in Brussels, Belgium, Thursday, July 12, 2018. (AP Photo/Olivier Matthys)

Olivier Matthys/The Associated Press

From, The U.S. exiting NATO is no longer impossible to imagine – here’s how it could happen, by Adrian Morrow

Trump’s right on this. Pay your fair share or get out. Too many countries, including Canada, have decided to shirk their earlier commitments. Time to pay the piper, and if you don’t want to, get out, but don’t complain. – robit17

User My Opinion. weighed in on robit17’s comment:

It isn’t a simple case of “pay your fair share”. The guideline is that country’s should spend 2% of their GDP on defense by 2024. Our spending has consistently increased each year toward that goal. Trump is just ignoring that and saying whatever he needs to make him seem like a saint, even if it’s factually wrong. – My Opinion.

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From, Ontario scraps rebated for buyers of electric vehicles, by Greg Keenan

The goal of such rebates is to reduce the costs for early adopters and develop a critical mass of sales, market size, and manufacturing expertise to speed the transition away from gasoline and diesel vehicles. An alternate method would be to impose surcharges on the sale of high-consumption vehicles and/or bring in a higher carbon tax more quickly. But the same people would whine about that approach too. – Mark Shore

Doug Lippay wrote this response:

Why not just let the market decide for themselves? It usually works more often than not. When any gov’t get’s involved it generally just manages to complicate things and that is seldom the way to the best solution or best practises. – Doug Lippay

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