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Style Toronto’s dearly departed Queen West Antique Centre revived in Hamilton

The Queen West Antique Centre has been reborn in Hamilton as Filter.

Toronto’s Queen Street West has long held a reputation for being an artery of cool, but with that honour comes the pressure to constantly evolve. It’s a cycle that unfortunately includes the departure of some beloved retail residents. Recently, the Queen West Antique Centre, which held court at Queen Street West and Roncesvalles Avenue for more than two decades, closed shop.

But clients missing its retro housewares need to look no further than Hamilton, which is where it has reopened as Filter. For Mike Mason, who owns Filter with his wife, Amy, relocating to Hamilton has ignited a rather familiar sense of creative energy. “To a certain extent, where we are now is very reminiscent to me of what it was like being on Queen West in the late 90s and early 2000s,” he says. “It’s a vibrant and exciting thing going on where everyone is anticipating excitedly what’s going to happen next. It’s fun to be a part of it – again.”

Housed in what was originally a 1930s grocery store, which Mason remodelled over the summer, Filter has expanded its offerings into the traditional antiques category, adding larger statement pieces that can be accommodated by their new clients’ spacious suburban homes. “As much as we specialize in Danish modern and mid-century modern, I like the mix of putting antique pieces with 1960s pieces with 1980s pieces and just having fun with the whole thing, whether that be furniture or lighting or accessories or art,” Mason says.

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Filter, 271 Ottawa St. N., Hamilton, Ont., 905-522-3940, www.filter.design.

Style news

Culture ViewFinder has launched in Canada, offering a new way to explore culture. The travel platform is the creation of Esther E. Shipman, a renowned Canadian architecture and design curator with more than 35 years of experience in her field. It offers insider access to cultural travel focusing on contemporary art, architecture, design, food and wine. Two tours announced for 2019 are bringing Portugal’s creative renaissance to life in the Douro Valley in June and Lisbon and Porto in October. For more information, visit cultureviewfinder.com.

German natural skin-care pioneer Weleda has a loyal following for its Skin Food moisturizing cream, which was originally introduced in 1926. For the first time in nearly 100 years, Weleda has expanded that beloved formula beyond its Original Ultra-Rich Cream into a new four-piece collection for the entire body. Skin Food is now available in a fast-absorbing Light Nourishing Cream, a whipped Body Butter and an oil-based Lip Butter. The affordable collection ranges from $9.90 to $23.10 and is available at well.ca., Whole Foods Market and at natural health and wellness stores.

When American Apparel shut down in 2017, it left a big void in the underwear drawers of customers who appreciated its colourful cotton offerings. On Jan. 28, the reinvigorated brand relaunched with its new Intimates & Lounge collection, the first product drop of its spring 2019 offerings. The collection features sizes ranging from XS to XXL in a core collection as well as the introduction of the Shadow Strip, a striped fabric that has a peek-a-boo effect and lounge offerings made of a silk-like fiber sourced from beech trees. It’s available exclusively online at americanapparel.com.

Toronto Fashion Week is back at Yorkville Village for its spring 2019 season showcasing some major talent in Canadian fashion. Running from Feb. 5 to 7, this season will see presentations in a variety of venues in the Yorkville area including the Royal Ontario Museum, the Gardiner Museum, fitness centre Equinox and the Yorkville Village Parking Garage. The spring 2019 lineup includes familiar fashion week faces such as Mikhael Kale, Narces, Hilary MacMillan and David Dixon as well as cheeky lingerie brand Kiki de Montparnasse. In partnership with the Canadian Arts & Fashion Awards, there’s also a series of daily discussions hosted by Donna Bishop, the founder and host of Fashion Talks podcast. For more information and to purchase tickets, visit torontofashionweek.to.

Editor’s note: (Feb. 6, 2019) An earlier version of this article incorrectly referred to David Dixon as a jewellery designer. This version has been updated.
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