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Style Fortnight Lingerie opens its first boutique to help customers find their perfect fit

Fortnight Lingerie's West Queen West boutique is bright and airy, with a warm colour palette.

Ryan Carter

At Fortnight Lingerie’s new Toronto boutique, shopping for undergarments feels more like visiting a friend’s trendy, downtown home. Located on West Queen West facing the popular Trinity Bellwoods park, the retail space is bright and airy, with curved fixtures (vintage mirrors and acrylic chairs from the 1970s, a rounded L-shaped desk and spherical flower vases) and a warm colour palette that are an homage to the female form.

For Fortnight founder Christina Remenyi, the decision to open her nine-year-old brand’s first retail space was not only an opportunity to showcase her entire range under one roof (Fortnight has a cup size range from A to G and band sizes from 30 to 40), but also a chance to help demonstrate the benefits of properly fitting undergarments. “In person, I’m able to explain to people what they’re looking for so when they do buy online, if it’s cutting a little bit or if that wire line isn’t quite resting where it’s supposed to be, maybe the cup’s too small,” she says. “That education process is really hard to do online. It’s a lot of information.”

Fortnight’s entire collection is manufactured in Toronto with fabrics such as jersey and floral jacquard lace that Remenyi sources in Europe, with a design emphasis on feminine pieces that flatter and fit without compromising on style. In addition to lingerie, Fortnight also offers sleepwear and swimwear and has recently expanded into activewear. Located just down the street from its headquarters, this new home brings all of the elements of Fortnight to life. “It’s nice to create an experience,” Remenyi says.

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Fortnight Lingerie, 913 Queen St. W., Toronto, 437-228-5195, fortnightlingerie.com.

Style news

The Brooklyn Museum is hosting an exhibition dedicated to the signature style of Mexican artist Frida Kahlo. Running from Feb. 8 to May 12, Frida Kahlo: Appearances Can Be Deceiving is the first American exhibition to display some of her clothing and personal possessions. Alongside paintings, drawings and photographs, the artifacts include examples of her Tehuana clothing, contemporary and pre-colonial jewellery and hand-painted corsets and prosthetics. The selection examines how Kahlo crafted her appearance and personal and public identities. For more information on the exhibition, which is presented by Revlon, visit brooklynmuseum.org.

The 2019 Canadian Alliance of Film & Television Costume Arts & Design (CAFTCAD) Awards will be presented on Feb. 10. Held in Toronto at the Aga Khan Museum, this is the first national costume arts and design awards celebration to take place in Canada. The awards honour costume designers and artisans who are either permanent residents of citizens of Canada and have contributed to feature films, short films, television projects, music videos, web series and commercials produced in the country. This year, nominees worked on high-profile productions including The Shape of Water and Schitt’s Creek. For more information, visit thecaftcadawards.com.

Finding a gift for that special someone this Valentine’s Day is easier than ever as brands have new selections and collaborations on offer for the romantic holiday. Toronto flower delivery on demand service Tonic Blooms has plenty of red rose alternatives, including a free package of Teapigs Chocolate Flake Tea with each order. Canadian jewellery brand Mejuri has partnered with online floral delivery company Floom on limited-edition bouquets available in London, New York and Los Angeles, which were inspired by Mejuri’s new candles. And Tiffany & Co. offers personalization and customization in store for select pieces.

Designer Curtis Oland is hopping the pond to take part in the 2019 International Fashion Showcase (IFS) during London Fashion Week. Produced by Indigenous Fashion Week Toronto (IFWTO), Oland’s fashion installation Delicate Tissue is on view as part of IFS from Feb. 11 to 24 at Somerset House. Oland is a Lil’Wat and Scottish-Canadian designer who was one of 16 selected to exhibit at IFS. In addition to fashion by Oland, Delicate Tissue includes handcrafted copper jewellery by Jennifer Younger, video and virtual reality by Nyla Innuksuk and music by Cris Derksen and Ziibiiwan. For more information, visit somersethouse.org.uk.

Visit tgam.ca/newsletters to sign up for the weekly Style newsletter, your guide to fashion, design, entertaining, shopping and living well. And follow us on Instagram @globestyle.

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